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Pearls

Akoya:

Pearls are a product of the mollusc. The mollusc reacts to the foreign body that penetrates between the mollusc shell and mantle or inside the mantle. In cultured pearls, a nacre is implanted in the mollusc. The foreign body is gradually grown around by the mantle and the nacre excretion builds up the mollusc shell. After approx. 3 - 4 years, the epithelium of the mantle forms a pearl sac, and the nacre mass is concentrically laid around the foreign body in a thickness of 0.8 - 1.2 mm. There are different types of pearls, the best known are Akoya pearls, Keshi pearls, China pearls or South Sea pearls. The Akoya cultured pearl is the classic form of cultured pearl, which originated around 1900. The mostly round pearls are found in colours ranging from cream gold - green-white - to grey. Black, but mostly also grey pearls are coloured. The most expensive pearl colour is white-rosé. The round shape is practically predetermined by the implantation of mother-of-pearl beads. Akoya cultured pearls are grown in sizes up to 9 mm in diameter. Pearls in the size of 9 mm are very difficult to grow and are therefore very rare and also correspondingly expensive. However, it is not the size alone that determines the value of a pearl, but the interplay of size, colour, luster and thickness of the luster.

South Sea:

One of the most expensive of all cultured pearls, it is created in the silver-lipped pearl chandelier. It is cultivated in South Sea waters, mainly on the north coast of Australia. Their colour is mostly silver-grey, but can also be rosé, gold, grey to dark grey-black. It is mostly bred in sizes over 10 mm. For this reason, the prices are so high that they are mostly processed as single pearls.


Keshi:

Keshi - pearls are seedless saltwater cultured pearls, which are produced in Japanese waters in the Akoya oyster and in the South Sea in the silver-lipped oyster. The irregular, sometimes bizarre shapes occur in the delicate natural colours of grey, white, rosé and gold, just like the related Akoya or South Sea pearls. They are random products of nature, for when the implanted nacre seeds are ejected from the oyster from time to time and the particles left behind are spun around, there are no limits to the development of pearl shapes of diverse imagination.

Freshwater pearls:

These are seedless freshwater cultured pearls which, as the name suggests, are cultivated in the Middle Kingdom. The cultivation takes place in the related Biwa pearl oyster. The Biwa pearl was the best-known freshwater pearl; it was cultivated in the lake of the same name near Kyoto. But due to increasing environmental pollution, it overturned in the mid-1980s and pearl cultivation is no longer possible to this day, so that freshwater pearls now come mainly from China. The prerequisite for the most diverse forms is that foreign tissue particles are implanted in both halves of the mantle of the mussel. They produce a variety of attractive, delicate natural colours, such as white-pink, salmon-orange or golden-brown to grey. Apart from seedless freshwater cultured pearls, pearls with cores are also cultivated, but mainly in sizes over 8 mm in diameter. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)

Akoya: Pearls are a product of the mollusc. The mollusc reacts to the foreign body that penetrates between the mollusc shell and mantle or inside the mantle. In cultured pearls, a nacre is... read more »
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Pearls

Akoya:

Pearls are a product of the mollusc. The mollusc reacts to the foreign body that penetrates between the mollusc shell and mantle or inside the mantle. In cultured pearls, a nacre is implanted in the mollusc. The foreign body is gradually grown around by the mantle and the nacre excretion builds up the mollusc shell. After approx. 3 - 4 years, the epithelium of the mantle forms a pearl sac, and the nacre mass is concentrically laid around the foreign body in a thickness of 0.8 - 1.2 mm. There are different types of pearls, the best known are Akoya pearls, Keshi pearls, China pearls or South Sea pearls. The Akoya cultured pearl is the classic form of cultured pearl, which originated around 1900. The mostly round pearls are found in colours ranging from cream gold - green-white - to grey. Black, but mostly also grey pearls are coloured. The most expensive pearl colour is white-rosé. The round shape is practically predetermined by the implantation of mother-of-pearl beads. Akoya cultured pearls are grown in sizes up to 9 mm in diameter. Pearls in the size of 9 mm are very difficult to grow and are therefore very rare and also correspondingly expensive. However, it is not the size alone that determines the value of a pearl, but the interplay of size, colour, luster and thickness of the luster.

South Sea:

One of the most expensive of all cultured pearls, it is created in the silver-lipped pearl chandelier. It is cultivated in South Sea waters, mainly on the north coast of Australia. Their colour is mostly silver-grey, but can also be rosé, gold, grey to dark grey-black. It is mostly bred in sizes over 10 mm. For this reason, the prices are so high that they are mostly processed as single pearls.


Keshi:

Keshi - pearls are seedless saltwater cultured pearls, which are produced in Japanese waters in the Akoya oyster and in the South Sea in the silver-lipped oyster. The irregular, sometimes bizarre shapes occur in the delicate natural colours of grey, white, rosé and gold, just like the related Akoya or South Sea pearls. They are random products of nature, for when the implanted nacre seeds are ejected from the oyster from time to time and the particles left behind are spun around, there are no limits to the development of pearl shapes of diverse imagination.

Freshwater pearls:

These are seedless freshwater cultured pearls which, as the name suggests, are cultivated in the Middle Kingdom. The cultivation takes place in the related Biwa pearl oyster. The Biwa pearl was the best-known freshwater pearl; it was cultivated in the lake of the same name near Kyoto. But due to increasing environmental pollution, it overturned in the mid-1980s and pearl cultivation is no longer possible to this day, so that freshwater pearls now come mainly from China. The prerequisite for the most diverse forms is that foreign tissue particles are implanted in both halves of the mantle of the mussel. They produce a variety of attractive, delicate natural colours, such as white-pink, salmon-orange or golden-brown to grey. Apart from seedless freshwater cultured pearls, pearls with cores are also cultivated, but mainly in sizes over 8 mm in diameter. Translated with www.DeepL.com/Translator (free version)